NYC / Tuesday Nov 18,2014
8:30 am - 3:30 pm

NYU Development Research Institute Conference

Urban Determinants of Success

Rosenthal Pavilion
Kimmel Center, 10th Floor
60 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012
RSVP

On November 18, the Marron Institute partnered with the Development Research Institute to host a conference on Cities and Development: Urban Determinants of Success. The conference — which included presentations from Paul Romer, Bill Easterly & Laura Freschi, Edward Glaeser, Alain Bertaud, and Nassim Taleb — focused on the conditions under which prospertiy emerges in urban areas, contributing to the larger process of human and economic development. 

Highlights and full lectures from the conference here.

Speakers

Alain Bertaud
Alain Bertaud
Senior Research Scholar / Marron Institute

Alain Bertaud is a Senior Research Scholar at the Marron Institute. At the moment, he is writing a book about urban planning that is tentatively titled Order Without Design. Bertaud previously held the position of principal urban planner at the World Bank. After retiring from the Bank in 1999, he worked as an independent consultant. Prior to joining the World Bank he worked as a resident urban planner in a number of cities around the world: Bangkok, San Salvador (El Salvador), Port au Prince (Haiti), Sana’a (Yemen), New York, Paris, Tlemcen (Algeria), and Chandigarh (India).

Bertaud’s research, conducted in collaboration with GIS-expert Marie-Agnès Bertaud, aims to bridge the gap between operational urban planning and urban economics. Their work focuses primarily on the interaction between urban forms, real estate markets and regulations. Bertaud earned the Architecte DPLG diploma from the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris.

Paul Romer
Paul Romer
University Professor (on leave) / NYU

Paul Romer, an economist and policy entrepreneur, is a University Professor taking leave from NYU to serve as Chief Economist of the World Bank starting September 26, 2016. Romer was the former Director of the Marron Institute and the founding director of the Urbanization Project at the Leonard N. Stern School of Business. The Urbanization Project conducts applied research on the many ways in which policymakers in the developing world can use the rapid growth of cities to create economic opportunity and undertake systemic social reform.

Before coming to NYU, Paul taught at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. While there Paul took an entrepreneurial detour to start Aplia, an education technology company dedicated to increasing student effort and classroom engagement. To date, students have submitted over 1 billion answers to homework problems on the Aplia website.

Prior to Stanford, Paul taught in the economics departments at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of Chicago, and the University of Rochester. He is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a non-resident scholar at both the Center for Global Development in Washington, D.C. and the Macdonald Laurier Institute in Ottawa, Ontario. In 2002, he received the Recktenwald Prize for his work on the role of ideas in sustaining economic growth.

Paul earned a bachelor of science in mathematics from the University of Chicago. He earned a doctorate in economics from the University of Chicago after doing graduate work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Queens University.